D'ANGELICO
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D'ANGELICO
Instruments previously built in New York, NY between 1932 and 1964.
Master Luthier John D'Angelico (1905-1964) was born and raised in New York City, NY. In 1914, he apprenticed to his Great-uncle, and learned the luthier trade of building and repairing stringed instruments. After 18 years of working on stringed instruments, he opened his own shop on Kenmare Street (D'Angelico was 27). D'Angelico guitars were entirely handcrafted by D'Angelico with assistance by shop employees such as Vincent DiSerio (assistant/apprentice from 1932 to 1959). In the early 1950s, D'Angelico's workshop had a bench and counter for guitar work, and a showcase with new United or Favilla guitars, used "trade-ins" and a few amplifiers from Nat Daniel's Danelectro or Everett Hull´s Ampeg company. A very young James D'Aquisto became the second assistant to the shop in 1953.
In 1959, the building where D'Angelico worked and lived was condemned by the city due to an unsafe foundation. While scouting out new locations, D'Angelico and DiSerio had a serious argument over finances. DiSerio left and accepted work at the Favilla guitar plant. After a number of months went by, D'Angelico and D'Aquisto finally reopened the guitar shop at its new location. Unfortunately, D'Angelico's health began to take a turn for the worse. John D'Angelico passed away in his sleep in September of 1964.
John D'Angelico created 1,164 serialized acoustic guitars (electric models were not part of the serialization ledgers), as well as unnumbered mandolins and novelty instruments. For complete model listings, refer to the Blue Book of Acoustic Guitars. Source: Paul William Schmidt, Acquired of the Angels.

From Blue Book Publications:


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